Psychology Meets Scripture on the topic of ‘worry’ #MentalHealthAwarenessWeek

Worry is a chain of thoughts and images, negatively laden and relatively uncontrollable; it represents an attempt to engage in mental problem-solving on an issue whose outcome is uncertain but contains the possibility of one or more negative outcomes to the point of debilitating the ‘worrier’ in a state of anxiety.Definition of Worry adapted from … Continue reading Psychology Meets Scripture on the topic of ‘worry’ #MentalHealthAwarenessWeek

Day 3 – Psychology of Forgiveness

Hearing ‘I’m sorry’, ‘I messed up’, ‘I feel terrible for what I did’ is like music to our ears. It feels good when someone acknowledges their wrongdoing towards you and oftentimes it makes it much easier to forgive them, right? But what if they never apologise. The reality is that some people will never apologise for their wrongdoing towards you, and waiting on them to apologise before you forgive will cost you your mental freedom. This is why we must LEARN TO FORGIVE, EVEN WITHOUT AN APOLOGY.

Day 1 – Psychology of Forgiveness

Remembering an event, a situation, or a person can evoke a shiver of excitement, the heat of anger, or the anguish of grief. Although emotion that is activated by a memory may not be felt as intensely as the actual experience, the recall can be enjoyable or painful nonetheless. Thankfully, the command is to forgive and not necessarily to forget, because let’s face it — it is virtually impossible to forget certain experiences whether good or bad.

Psychology of Forgiveness

This devotional is where ‘psychology meets scripture’ on the topic of forgiveness. Oftentimes, we passively forgive an offender, with a simple ‘I forgive you’, however, the challenge comes when you are reminded of their offence every time you see them. Or when you find it hard to get rid of that negative memory. Sometimes these recurring memories and feelings make you question whether you have really forgiven them or not.

Day 8 – Beauty In The Beast: How To Suffer Well

The fact that we can see a purpose in our pain does not make the experience any less painful and it in no way undermines our suffering. Instead, a purposeful outlook on suffering says; the will of God for me remains good even when my reality does not look good. A purposeful outlook on suffering prizes the eternal promise of glory over our 'light' and 'momentary' afflictions.